News

Dead shark found on New York City subway

Dead shark found on New York City subway

A dead shark was discovered on a New York City subway train. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (Reuters) – New York City subway riders got a surprise on Wednesday when a dead shark was discovered on a Queens-bound subway train, authorities said.

A supervisor found the four-foot-long carcass shortly after midnight, moved the passengers onto another car and discarded it at the end of the line, according to Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokesman Kevin Ortiz.

Photos of the shark appeared on the Gothamist website, along with pictures of passengers posing the shark with accessories such as a cigarette and a subway fare card.

This happens to be Shark Week, a annual promotion by the Discovery Channel dedicated to sharks. A spokeswoman for the Discovery Channel said it had nothing to do with the shark on the subway.

Recent Headlines

in Music

Joan Jett to open for The Who’s 50th anniversary tour

Fresh
Joan Jett attends a screening of Lifetime's "Big Driver" on Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, in New York.

Joan Jett & The Blackhearts will open for The Who when they embark on the next leg of their 50th anniversary tour in 2015.

in Music

Gene Simmons credits mother for drug-free life

Gene Simmons speaks onstage during the "4th and Loud" portion of the AMC 2014 Summer TCA on Friday, July 11, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

The Kiss frontman insists he has never been drunk or gotten high because he always worried about his mom's reaction.

in Music

Joan Jett to open for The Who’s 50th anniversary tour

joan

The "My Generation" hitmakers are set to bring their The Who Hits 50! tour to North America.

in Entertainment

Chris Pratt thought ‘Guardians’ would be a box office flop

Guardians Of The Galaxy

The "Parks and Rec" star was very, very wrong.

in Lifestyle

We’re living 6 years longer

doctor

Fewer people are dying from cancer and heart disease in rich countries and there's a better survival rate in poor countries from tuberculosis and malaria.